In Vivo Anthelmintic Effect of Ginger (Zingiber Officinale) Powder against Gastointestinal Nematodes of Artificially Infected Pigs

Author(s): Tracey Kiambom, Marc K Kouam, Cedric D Ngangoum, Bridget Kate, Alexis Teguia

Anthelminthic resistance remains a major hindrance in controlling gastrointestinal parasites. Hence the need for alternative, more ecofriendly and readily affordable solutions. This paper evaluates the anthelmintic effect of Zingiber officinale (ginger) powder on the parasitic load of pigs experimentally infected with an association of Strongyloides ransomi, Hyostrongylus rubidus, Trichostrongylus axei and Globocephalus urosubulatus. A total of 24 pigs of two months old were randomly allocated to four treatment groups (G1 to G4). All the four groups were infected with 2650 L3 larva. Group 1 (the negative control, T0-) was not treated. Group 2 (the positive control, T0+) was treated with Mebendazole. Group 3(T1) was treated with 12.5g/kg of ginger crude powder and Group 4(T2) was treated with 25g/kg of ginger crude powder. For Strongyloides ransomi eggs, the treatment with 25g/kg of ginger (T2) showed the highest fecal egg count reduction (FECR) of 92.6% followed by treatments with 12.5g/kg of ginger (T1) and treatment with mebendazole (T0+) with a FECR of 83.4% and 72% respectively. Also, treatment with 25g/kg of ginger (T2) showed the highest FECR of 92% followed by treatments with 12.5g/kg of ginger (T1) and treatment with mebendazole (T0+) with FECR of 89.4% and 73.8% respectively for strongyle eggs. The dose of 25g/kg of ginger powder was effective in reducing egg shed and keeping the parasitic load of Strongyloides ransomi and strongyle eggs constantly low for six weeks after treatment. Therefore, 25g/kg of ginger powder could be administered every six weeks to reduce the parasitic load of the studied nematodes.

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